Effect of protein glycation in the presence or absence of wheat proteins on detection of soybean proteins by commercial ELISA

C Platteau, T Cucu, B De Meulenaer, B Devreese, M De Loose, I Taverniers

    Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-articlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Soybean (Glycine max) is the world's primary provider of protein and oil and is widely used in foodstuffs. However, the use of soybean in foodstuffs might pose a serious threat to allergic consumers since some proteins can cause allergic reactions. To date mostly ELISA methods are used for testing contamination of foodstuffs with soybean. In view of the complexity regarding allergen detection in foodstuffs and appropriate food product labelling, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the Maillard reaction on the detectability of soybean proteins using commercial ELISA kits. Accumulation of protein-bound carbonyls, modification of reactive lysine residues and severe aggregation as a result of incubation with glucose, in the presence or absence of soluble wheat proteins, were recorded. Moreover, detection of soybean proteins by means of three commercial ELISA kits was strongly altered and was highly dependent on the type of kit used.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalFood Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment
    Volume28
    Issue number2
    Pages (from-to)127-35
    Number of pages9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Keywords

    • Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
    • Food
    • Food Analysis
    • Food Contamination
    • Food Handling
    • Food Hypersensitivity
    • Glucose
    • Glycosylation
    • Kinetics
    • Lysine
    • Maillard Reaction
    • Plant Proteins
    • Protein Carbonylation
    • Protein Denaturation
    • Solubility
    • Soybean Proteins
    • Triticum

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