Life cycle of the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor on potato and consequences for damage development

Wim Wesemael, Lirette Taning, Alamgir Khan, Nicole Viaene, Maurice Moens

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingC3: Conference Abstractpeer-review

    Abstract

    Life cycle of the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor on potato and consequences for damage development.

    Wim M.L. Wesemael1,2, Lirette M. Taning2, Alamgir Khan2, Nicole Viaene1,2 and Maurice Moens1,3
    1Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO), Burg. Van Gansberghelaan 96, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
    2Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Ghent University, K.L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
    3Faculty of Bio-science engineering, Laboratory for Agrozoology, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, B-9000-Ghent, Belgium

    The temperate root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor are able to reproduce on potato and cause quality damage to the tubers. As tubers are not present at initial penetration of the nematodes into the plant roots, it is the second generation that initiates damage. Knowledge on the life cycle duration and the time at which a second generation is formed is therefore of paramount importance to avoid damaged tubers. To assess the life cycle of M. chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor, young potato plants were inoculated with freshly hatched second-stage juveniles (J2). The developmental stages of the root-knot nematodes were recorded at weekly intervals after inoculation until second-generation J2 were detected. For M. chitwoodi and M. fallax the degree-days (DD5, base temperature 5°C) required for completing their life cycle were 555-740 DD5. Between 606 and 727 DD5 were needed for M. minor to complete the life cycle. The host plant status of five potato cultivars (Asterix, Bintje, Nicola, Lady Rosetta and Première) for M. chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor was determined by evaluating egg mass formation. The three Meloidogyne species developed less egg masses on cv. Première when compared with the other cultivars but in general high numbers of egg masses were found on all cultivars. It is clear from our results that the production of commercially important potato cultivars can be threatened by M. chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor as they complete their life cycle within the average crop cycle and second generations can affect the tubers. Therefore, further spread of these nematodes in agricultural fields should be avoided.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAbstracts of the 19th triennial conference EAPR 2014
    Publication date2014
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Event19th Triennial Conference of the European Association for Potato Research - Merelbeke, Brussel, Belgium
    Duration: 6-Jul-201411-Jul-2014
    http://www.eapr2014.be/

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