Survival of Meloidogyne chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor in waste streams of the vegetable and potato processing industry

Wim Wesemael, Stephanie Beelaert, Evelien Aussems, Md Rubel Mahmud, Martin Baiye, Nicole Viaene

    Onderzoeksoutput: Hoofdstuk in Boek/Rapport/CongresprocedureC3: Congres abstract

    Uittreksel

    Survival of Meloidogyne chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor in waste streams of the vegetable and potato processing industry.

    WIM M.L. WESEMAEL1,2,3, STEPHANIE BEELAERT1, EVELIEN AUSSEMS2, MD. RUBEL MAHMUD2, MARTIN BAIYE2 and NICOLE VIAENE1,2 1

    Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO), Burg. Van Gansberghelaan 96, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium 2Nematology Unit, Department of Biology, Ghent University, Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium 3Laboratory for Agrozoology, Faculty of Bioscience engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium

    ABSTRACT The root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne chitwoodi and M. fallax are listed as quarantine organisms in the EU. European legislation aims to prevent their spread. In Belgium, M. chitwoodi and M. fallax are present in areas with potato and vegetable production. The infested area is confined to certain regions and avoiding further spread is of paramount importance. Only second-stage juveniles (J2) and males move freely in the soil but these movements are limited. Passive dispersal through soil, (waste)water and plant material is more important. To assess the risk of spread through waste products a survey was conducted to determine if quarantine nematodes are present in waste products of the potato and vegetable processing industry. From our results it is clear that soil adhering to plant products poses a threat and should be subjected to phytosanitary measures. Also, survival of M. chitwoodi, M. fallax and M. minor in (waste)water and soil was assessed. The effect of treatments such as drying, heat, inundation, sonication and UV on J2 and intact egg masses was examined. Eggs inside intact egg masses were better protected than loose eggs or J2, resulting in higher survival rates. Cost-effective treatments are available and, together with increased awareness, can avoid further spread of quarantine nematodes.

    This study was funded by the Federal Public Service of Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment (contract RT13/7 NEMASPREAD).

    TaalEngels
    TitelAdvances in Nematology, a one day conference at the Linnean Society of London
    Datum2016
    StatusGepubliceerd - 2016
    EvenementAdvances in Nematology: a one day conference at the Linnean Society of London - London, Verenigd Koninkrijk
    Duur: 15-dec-201515-dec-2015

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